According To The FDA Frosted Flakes Are Healthier Than AvocadosThe Food and Drug Administration is an organization whose motives and influences have long been questioned by American citizens.

Many speculate that the organization has been bribed by Big Food companies who want a hold on what the FDA deems as healthy so that adults and children can be misguided about what to eat.

Based on a rudimentary system of saying that any food that’s low in fat, sodium, and cholesterol, as well as full of some “beneficial nutrients,” many processed foods are healthier than wholesome produce in the eyes of the FDA.

The FDA also doesn’t have a caveat that states that foods high in unsaturated fat (the healthy kind found in avocados, for example) are better than foods low in saturated fat.

This poses a problem, as the source of the fat and other components that make up food products and whether they were formed naturally is important and critical to the health of the person consuming it.

In a widely-circulated example of the absurdity of this logic, the FDA essentially says that Frosted Flakes, which are loaded with sugar and have minimal nutrients, are healthier than avocados.

Though the laws governing what is healthy have been long-standing, the outrage over them increased recently when the FDA wrote a 3,200 word letter to Kind snack food company, attacking them for calling their bars “healthy.”

The organization demanded that Kind stop calling their bars healthy, even though the bars are full of antioxidants and essential fatty acids, and instead the FDA received backlash from angry citizens who actually know what “healthy” means.

In the heat of the backlash, the FDA admitted that their definition of what is good to consume was outdated and agreed to redefine the term. Though this is promising, it’s likely that their new definition will be equally as vague as the last in order to keep Big Food’s products within the healthy range.

Since the word “healthy” can no longer be trusted, here are some other words that people see at the supermarket often but can be deceiving: wholesome, natural, and nutritious. None of these terms are officially defined by the FDA and are therefore used on a range of very unwholesome, unnatural, and innutritious foods.

When it comes to health, the FDA doesn’t have Americans’ best interests in mind, meaning that consumers must do their own research if they hope to eat and drink products that might actually benefit them.

Watch the video below to see the Wall Street Journal break it down.


This article was chosen for republication based on the interest of our readers. CSGlobe republishes stories from a number of other independent news sources, and are not produced by CSGlobe. Any views or opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author/source presented below, and do not necessarily reflect the position of CSGlobe or its staff.
SOURCEtrueactivist
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